Marquetry - (Furniture Decoration)

Marquetry - (Furniture, Decoration) Marquetry is the decorative process of cutting, fitting and inlaying veneers of various shaped pieces of woods (bones and ivory) in a darker veneer ground forming a mosaic for application to the carcass of a piece of furniture. It may be floral, arabesque, figurative or other pattern. Sometimes the edges of the pieces are held briefly in a flame to give the wood a darkened color thus giving dimension to the decoration. This form of furniture decoration was first used Germany and the Low Countries. It was introduced from there to England in the 1670's and to France in the 1700's. Floral marquetry was in vogue at first but towards the end of the seventeenth century and in the early years of the eighteenth century a type of veneer in which two contrasting woods only were used, called arabesque or seaweed marquetry, came into fashion. A revival of marquetry took place in the second half of the eighteenth century. If the pattern is geometrical, it is called Parquetry. Marquetry should not be confused with Inlay.

Woodworker's Guide to Veneering & Inlay: Techniques, Projects & Expert Advice for Fine FurnitureWoodworker's Guide to Veneering & Inlay: Techniques, Projects & Expert Advice for Fine Furniture 

0 comments:

Post a Comment