Cartes de Visite - (Photography)

TheAntiqueTrade.co.uk Glossary of Antique Terms C

Cartes de Visite - (Photography) Cartes de visite is the predecessor of the cabinet card. The carte de visite or CDV was a type of small photograph which was patented in Paris, France by photographer André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri in 1854. It was usually made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card. The size of a carte de visite is 2⅛ × 3½ inches mounted on a card sized 2½ × 4 inches. It was made popular in 1854 in Europe, and from 1860 in the United States. The new invention was so popular it was known as "cardomania" and eventually spread throughout the world. In 1854, Disdéri had also patented a method of taking eight separate negatives on a single plate. Each photograph was the size of a visiting card, and such photograph cards became enormously popular and were traded among friends and visitors. The immense popularity of these card photographs led to the publication and collection of photographs of prominent persons. "Cardomania" spread throughout Europe and then quickly to America. Albums for the collection and display of cards became a common fixture in Victorian parlors. A photographer’s imprint adds to the value

0 comments:

Post a Comment